Tag Archives: marathon

Berlin Marathon Recap – my first DNF race

Hello!

Apologies for the lack of posting over the last months. I am going to try and get better at this blogging thing again. There’s a reason I wanted to write now and that’s my Berlin marathon recap, or shall I say a recap of 39km in the Berlin marathon 😀

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Anyone who follows me on social media would know that I collapsed and didn’t finish the race. Before I go into detail about the day, I have to tell that this wasn’t the first time I collapsed as it also happened at the London Marathon 2014. Be prepared, this will be a LONG recap of me talking about not only Berlin but the London one too.

The marathon was on last Sunday. Me and Minna flew to Berlin on Friday, got our race numbers on Saturday at the expo and were really excited for the day. My original goal was sub 3.30. Training for the past 4 months has been pretty good but during the last month I had issues with my hamstring which prevented me from running for a while. The preparation wasn’t ideal, I hadn’t done a long run or a hard run for a while before Berlin so I knew sub 3:30 would most likely be a struggle so anywhere near 3:30 would be nice. We had the chat with Minna beforehand where you tell each other it’s okay if it’s not a pb day, not every marathon is great. It might not be your day and don’t push it too much etc. If it doesn’t feel great at the start it’s not going to feel great at 35km that’s for sure. However, try and tell an ambitious person that maybe their goals are too ambitious. It wasn’t going to stop me from trying.berlinexpo1

Anyhow, we started in different pens and I was feeling good. The first couple of kilometers I felt so happy to be there and have the chance to run it so I decided to just enjoy the race and atmosphere. I started with 4:50ish min/km pace which would get me a sub 3:30. By 5km I had stomach cramps. I had the exact same feeling in my stomach at the London marathon at my worst race and it started really early on. I told myself I’m just being paranoid, this run will be great. By 10km I knew it wasn’t going to be great, I just didn’t feel good. A smart person would slow down a little as it’s not going to get any better later on but I’m not a smart person. I continued to run with the similar pace. By half way point I knew this will be hell. If you don’t feel great at halfway point at a marathon you know things aren’t going well. At that London marathon halfway point is where I pretty much wanted to give up, at Chester last year I felt great at half way but even there I got tired later. I drank water at every water station apart from one. I took my gels religiously every 8km. The weather was warm but not hot at that point. I don’t know why but running just felt so hard. Did I slow down? Nope.

By 30km I remember really starting to struggle not only with running but just feeling a bit delirious and just not clear headed anymore. This is where things went wrong in London as well. I was so focused and determined to run a pb that I refused to take my body signals into account. Everyone who runs a marathon knows that at some point, usually around 32-35km you will feel terrible, you hit the so called “wall”, sometimes it’s very hard, other times it’s not but you will feel like you need to stop. However, your legs can push through and run longer as long as you don’t let your brain convince otherwise. Mind over matter. As much as I like to be a determined person, i think it was my determination that actually caused all of this.

I don’t remember much from between 30-39km, I remember doing calculations in my head an knew that I am still getting a pb. I knew I couldn’t get sub 3:30 anymore and luckily I allowed myself to accept that but I still wanted 3:31-3.32 time. Even though I felt awful I kept pushing at that pace. I told myself it’s just the wall (that has lasted the whole marathon :D) and I have to convince my brain to get over it as my legs can do it. If only I understood that it was my brain warning me that I can’t keep going. Slowing down or stopping to walk wasn’t an option. I was so focused on pb that I refused to read my body. By the time it was 3km to the finish I knew that even if I slowed down to 6min/km pace I would still get  a pb. Did I do that? No, I slowed down but only a little. I think my pace got to 5:15. Thinking about it now, I could have stopped at 39 and walked to the finish and still finish in less than 4 hours; a respectable time for a marathon anytime. But no, that was not an option because in my head I felt like that means giving up and failing. Instead, I kept running and running until my body just shut down. I found myself at the side of the road as my legs just gave up. I didn’t lose consciousness but my body just did exactly what it did in London, my legs were unable to even stand they just went like spaghetti and I was on the ground.

This is when I started to feel really bad as well; imagine your biggest hangover and then multiply that by 10. I was lying on the ground with doctors and nurses helping me (I have no idea how I managed to collapse by the doctors or whether they came there later but I felt like there was immediately people helping me). I couldn’t move anything the feeling was so helpless and terrible and the disappointment when I realised it’s happened again and I’m not getting a pb. As soon as I was on the ground I heard the doctor tell me he has called the ambulance. I remember thinking that’s the end of my race if I have to go there, it can’t be the end of my race. At the same time the thought of actually getting up, let alone walking to the finish was worse. In London, after I collapsed I was taken to an emergency tent and I was there for 1,5 hours. After that I felt a lot better, I got up and walked/jogged 8km to the finish (I collapsed at 34km). In my head I thought I could still finish this race I just need to tell these doctors not to take me to the ambulance, but the words just didn’t come out of my mouth. I think because I was on the side of the road and not emergency tent they couldn’t have just left me there for hours to “wait and feel better”, they probably had to send me to hospital. German efficiency 🙂 But also, I didn’t tell them that I want to finish, I don’t know whether they would have let me or not and I am gutted I didn’t ask and try to stay there for a bit longer. At that point I felt so so bad though that I didn’t know whether I could finish. It’s easy to say now that I was only 2 or 3km away from finish, surely I could’ve even crawled that but never mind. They took me to the hospital and put a drip of electrolytes and water in me. They took some blood tests and said it looks like it was lack of electrolytes or dehydration. I was fine after couple of hours at the hospital. Massive thank you to an Irish man who was also there after collapsing and let me use his phone to call Minna who was super worried at the finish. (She ran 3:01!!!!!!!!!!!) The doctors said I’m not allowed to make an international call so Minna would have waited there for hours as my bag had the hotel keys and everything. Afterwards we walked back, I knew I needed food but didn’t feel like eating anything. Eventually I managed to have a smoothie which came back up 10 minutes later. After I was sick I started to feel better. It was exactly like a really bad hungover, just from running 39km.

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As I said before, I took water at pretty much every station, however the water was in tiny cups which I struggle to drink from as they spill everywhere. Also, some of the cups they gave us were only half full so from the half full cup after I spilled another half I probably only drank half of a half. Still, I didn’t feel super thirsty. I did feel really thirsty in London marathon and remember thinking that even drinking a bottle of water every 5km wasn’t enough. I also took 5 gels in Berlin, I normally take 4 but it seems like they just didn’t digest. Minna suggested that when you run too fast your body is unable to actually utilise the energy you are putting in so maybe because I ran too fast for my fitness levels from the very start the gels just didn’t actually absorb, so I was practically running on empty. Also the stomach cramps are suggesting the same thing, that I went off too fast. It’s easy to try and analyse and explain it now but thinking about the similarities to London there are few obvious ones.

Before London I was writing my final year dissertation for my Bachelor’s degree and I had had very stressful couple of months leading up to it. I basically handed in the diss on the same week as the marathon. I had also been injured and hadn’t trained, I started off way too fast and it was a hot day. In London they never told me why I collapsed, they suggested heat stroke.

For Berlin, I have had a stressful couple of months as well; I have been working full time and then writing my Master’s Dissertation on the weekends. I literally handed in my dissertation half hour before I had to take the bus to the airport to fly to Berlin. I had an injury that prevented some of the training, I started off too fast and it was a hot day. I don’t need to be a genius to realise that most likely my body doesn’t cope well under a lot of stress or at least doesn’t want to run a marathon in a stressed state. Maybe the heat had something to do with it, then again Chester marathon last year was hot too and I didn’t feel bad. Most likely, I went off too fast for my current level and that prevented the gels from absorbing and my body just gave up.

You know in marathons people always have signs that say: “Never quit”, “Giving up is not an option”. I think I should run a marathon where there is a sign saying: “Giving up is okay, you can quit”. I think my determination is so ridiculous that it refuses to differentiate just pure fatigue and lazyness from actual harmful situation and that is how I have ended up collapsing twice. If only I had slowed down, or even walked for a bit, I would have given myself a chance to finish the race but no. I had to keep going.

If anyone read to the finish then I’m impressed. My takeaways would be: “Be determined but be sensible!” 🙂

P.S. If this is read by anyone who was at the race and helped me then thank you! There was one runner who ran same pace as me pretty much the whole time and then tried to help me up when I collapsed. Talk about the great running community 🙂

 

My runs in 2015

Hello,

Since I’ve figured that I won’t be racing anymore this year (thanks knee!) and at the moment I’m unsure whether I’ll even run properly this year, I thought I’d share with you my runs so far this year in between my injuries.

In January I was training for Paris Marathon and on one of my longer runs my right ITB got extremely sore and from then on I battled with that pain on and off for few months.

I still ran a Bath half marathon in March even though it wasn’t my wisest of decisions (when are they ever?). I really wanted to beat George since we had pbs that were few seconds apart (mine was faster ;)) and I really liked Bath half the year before. My ITB was super sore from the start but I somehow finished in 1:39, which I was disappointed with at the time but thinking about it now, I hardly trained the 2 months leading to the race and I was only 2 minutes off my pb. George ran 1:36 something so I still have to beat him.

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Two weeks later my ITB wasn’t any better but there was an annual Swansea Trotters 5k event where current and graduated Swansea University students race against each other. The two previous years I’ve been too injured to run and I thought if I’ve managed a half marathon with the pain I can suffer through 5k. I managed 21:06 which ended up being my 5k pb. Very surprised again since I had hardly trained. I was happy with that time but it left me very eager to try and get sub 21 next time.

marina5kMy ITB got worse and worse and I eventually realised that Paris marathon in April was never going to happen. Everything was booked for me and Minna already but she got an injury too and neither of us could run it. The disappointment was massive since Paris Marathon is meant to be amazing but I think because Minna couldn’t run it either it helped to share the disappointment. We went to Paris and even to the marathon expo and had a great time just minus the little 42 kilometer run.

My ITB slowly got better when I actually let it rest and strengthened my glutes/hips etc.. I started back running in April and entered my first 5 mile race at the start of May; the Cardiff Bay 5 mile. I hadn’t done much longer runs (think longest was 10k up to that point) and the 5 mile race (8k) proved quite difficult. I ran it in 35:27. I hadn’t run a 5 mile race or even 10ks before so didn’t know what to compare it to really so I was pretty happy with that.

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Around this time I started getting my left knee pain (which is still an ongoing issue)… But few weeks later I ran my first ever 10k at the women’s running event.  I had started my blog by then so I actually have a race recap of that here. It was my first 10k so a guaranteed pb. I ran 44:17 which I was disappointed with timewise as I thought I could do closer to 42-43 minutes but I got a third place so happy overall. And I remember my knee didn’t hurt which was a bonus.

10kraceMiddle of June I ran my next half marathon, the Swansea one. I did it last year too and had high expectations as I knew it was a great flat course. Also, I thought I was in a lot better shape than for the Bath half in March and was 99% sure I could get a pb. The race recap is here. In summary, it was my worst half marathon ever. It was a warm day, I felt nauseous and dizzy and had to stop twice (first time in a half marathon). My time was 1:44 which I was majorly disappointed with because of my own high expectations. The only positive thing was that my knee held on and didn’t ache.

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I wanted to race more so I signed up for a 5k race in Port Talbot in July and was looking to get that sub 21. Unfortunately that didn’t happen as I ran 21:17 on a very windy day (excuses).  Race recap here.

Disappointment from the Swansea half left me looking for another half as I was convinced I could run a pb for that distance this year. I ended up doing the Severn Bridge half at the end of August. My knee pain was on and off at this point, it was very sore the week of the half but not during the race. The recap is here. I ran 1:37:38 which was 16 seconds off my pb. If I was disappointed with Swansea half I was definitely disappointed with missing out on a pb by so little. I do have to say that the course was extremely hilly and I had to walk up the steepest hill, plus I started off too fast so my own fault too.

Always happy to finish.And then it was finally time for the marathon. Gutted for missing out on Paris I decided to opt for a more “local” race in Chester on the 4th of October. My knee pain had made training difficult at times but I felt ready enough to tackle the distance. The race recap is here. It was a pb by 9 minutes and overall a very successful race. My knee hurt at the start but then eased off and I was very grateful I managed to run it. I had a major runner’s high for a long time after the race but my knee decided to have an all time low…

chestermaraIt has been just over a month since the marathon and I’ve tried very gentle running but it still hurts. Yesterday I managed 2 times 5 minute-segments and thought it was getting better only to notice it was worse afterwards. So no more races for this year but plenty planned for next year which I will tell you more about later (after I know I can actually run again).

Overall, I am quite happy with the year despite missing out on Paris and some pbs I still managed few good runs in between the injuries.

Let’s hope next year is faster and more importantly, injury-free!

Have a great week guys!

ratinassa33

 

 

Life after the marathon?

I’ve discovered there is life after the marathon. Last week I wasn’t sure of this; every plan I made was related to the marathon or only concerned the time before Sunday. Even food I bought was with the frame of mind that “I won’t eat this before the marathon anyway so no point of buying it”. As if I would never eat again after Sunday. Ha. Quite the opposite.  I don’t know if anyone else gets like this but I just get so focused on an important event and forget that life goes on after that as well.  (Life has  moved on but my legs still remind me that I’ve run a marathon everytime I take the stairs!)

Anyhow what are my plans now after the marathon has been done?

School wise I really need to get my ass in gear and focus on my dissertation. Also, I’m a maid of honour for my sister’s wedding this December (which is super exciting!!!) and that involves some planning and bits and bobs I need to sort out before.

But what are my plans for running?

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Before the marathon I was struggling with a serious knee pain and very unsure if I could run the marathon at all. I made a deal with my body then that if it will let me run the marathon without any major knee pain, I will let it rest from running for 2 weeks or a month. (I think I promised month but I have modified it to 2-3 weeks now :D). I really don’t want to not run, however, my body did let me run the marathon and I don’t want to let down my promise of giving it a rest.

I’ve been extremely injury prone for the last few years but I tend to ignore injuries and run through them as much as I can. This knee pain has been a problem since May so I think it’s time for me to take it seriously and actually rest and recover properly. I am also going to the physio next week to get it diagnosed as it has been extremely painful today and I think it’s time to get professional advice on it.

Any races planned? Yes and no. I wrote down a 10k race and a half marathon for November couple of months ago but I really don’t think that is wise. Chester marathon was the main aim, and although I would like to get a half marathon pb for this year there will be plenty more races next year and I think I can live with “just” a marathon pb until then. The smartest thing I can do is not rush into running but heal my knee and every niggle before I go back.

It’s hard when the Autumn weather is designed for running though.

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The plan is to focus on strengthening my body and make it injury-proof (if that’s possible). I’ll be going to the gym for some cardio to keep up fitness but also use the equipment to strengthen my body overall. I’ve been neglecting ab workouts and upper body workouts (can probably tell from my puny arms :D) when in marathon training so I’ll change the focus now to maintain the strenghtening exercises for legs plus add abs and upper body in now that I have more time.

I’ll probably still continue going to pilates because it makes me happy (and I tell myself it helps with injuries). I might look into yoga classes as well and see if I get hooked into that. Also, more stretching. Definitely more stretching. I’m actually planning on setting myself a very challenging goal related to stretching but I’ll tell you more about that next time 🙂

Happy exercising to you all!

Goals for Chester Marathon

So Chester marathon is on Sunday. That’s two sleeps away (help!).

What are my goals for the marathon? Well my first goal is to be able to finish the marathon without major knee pain. I went for a little test run today and my knee still hurts so that hasn’t exactly filled me with confidence. BUT, last year on my last run before Dublin marathon I was still injured and had hip pain, yet during the marathon I never felt it. Sooo maybe I won’t feel my knee pain on Sunday either (wishful thinking). I have never not finished a race but if it comes to that on Sunday then I will have to do it. At the end of the day running is only running and there will always be other races. I need that knee to be able to run a lot more in the future.

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How do people take photos when they run? My failed attempt.

But ignoring this knee pain, what are my goals for Chester marathon?

Definitely a pb. That has always been the goal for a marathon and I don’t see why it couldn’t happen this time. But what time am I actually aiming for? I still don’t know.

For about 2 years now I’ve been dreaming about sub 3:30 but it hasn’t happened and I haven’t even been near it. And now sub 3:30 sounds impossible as well. In training my goal marathon pace runs have been just under 5 min/km which equals to about 3:30 marathon. But I don’t feel confident that that time is doable.

There are numerous race time predictors that help you estimate your marathon time based on half marathon time for instance:

Runners world has one here According to this I should be able to run a 3:23 marathon. There’s another one here again predicting me about 3:23 finish. And the McMillan calculator here predicting me a time of 3:25. They all sound very ambitious. My recent half marathon was 1:37:38, double that it’s about 3:15 and according to the first two calculators I’d only spend extra 8 minutes for a full one. Emmm. I don’t think so. Maybe someone else would but not me with my fitness levels.

I managed to find another one that actually takes into account not only your recent race time but your average weekly mileage as well (makes a whole lot more sense to me). That calculator is here According to this one my marathon time would be either 3:37 or 3:39 depending on if I added just my half marathon time or my 10k and half marathon times to the calculator. As I mentioned in one of my previous posts, my weekly mileage has been quite low and since this predictor is taking that into account it’s probably closer to the truth than the 3:23. That’s a huge difference between the calculators!!

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So now it comes down to the pacing strategies.. I’ve always struggled to keep my pace consistent and especially in longer races it’s easy to start off way too fast as you are full of adrenaline and feeling great. There’s absolutely nothing worse than realising half way through a marathon that you started too fast because the second half can be pure hell from then on (been there done that). My goal is to try and pace myself so that I can enjoy the whole marathon. That being said, I’m not sure if you should enjoy running a marathon but at least I’d like to feel like I’m still alive at the 30km mark.

I recently read that you should set yourself multiple goals so you won’t be so disappointed if you don’t reach your only goal. For instance goal times that are “Amazing”,  “well done”, and “I can live with that”.

I’ve made myself a list of times and how they’d make me feel:

Sub 3:30 = Ridiculously unbelievably happy

Sub 3:35 = Very very happy

Sub 3:40 = Happy

Sub 3:45 = I can live with that.

My previous pb is 3:46, and I do believe I am in a better form than I was when I ran that. So if I break my pb by less than 5 minutes I will be disappointed. I know it’s still a pb but I know myself and I know I won’t be as happy.

The racing strategy is to aim for a negative split (run second half faster than first) but I don’t really know my form well enough and I can’t decide if I should start off with 5:05-5:10 pace and pick it up if I feel good or should I just ambitiously go for the 5 min/km pace and hope it’s not too fast. I’d hate to hit the wall because of my pacing but I’d also hate to feel like I should’ve started faster and I didn’t give my everything out on the course. Also, if I don’t make a plan what pace to stick with but just go with how I feel on the day I know I will go out too fast. I’ll have to decide before Sunday what my starting pace will be… Decisions decisions..

I hope I don’t get DNF next to my name. But all time goals and paces aside, you have to respect the marathon distance, and anything can happen during it.  Sometimes it just isn’t your day, and that is okay too.

At the end of the day, my biggest concern is my knee, if that knee doesn’t let me finish then so be it. And if it slows me down then fine, I’ll have to live with a time that’s slower than 3:45 but hey ho, it’s still another marathon done 🙂

Have a great weekend!

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Chester Marathon week.. Not as excited as I should be

SO the week of the marathon is here and I don’t even know how I’m feeling.
I was meant to do my last “long” run on Sunday which was going to be 15km. My knee started hurting from the start and just got worse from then on. Normally I run through the pain if it’s mild and just try and stretch it out.. I could count with one hand the times I’ve cut a run short. Call it determination or stupidity but even when I’ve been in pain I have finished the distance I’ve planned to do. This Sunday I turned back and cut the run just under 2km short running 13.3km. My leg was in agony for the rest of the day.. even walking hurt.. So I obviously got a bit terrified as I knew it was just a week left for the marathon. I’ve had this similar knee/IT band pain before and also on my right leg and it took forever to completely disappear. I’m not sure what eventually made it go away as I did so many things, hence I’m trying everything possible now as well.

I’ve been icing the leg like there’s no tomorrow, stretching, foam rolling, wearing compression sleeves, spraying magnesium joint spray, using ice power gel, ibuprofein gel…kneepain
I’ve been doing glute and quad strengthening exercises and tried to mobilise my ankle in case it’s to do with some other weaknesses in the kinetic chain.. In case it’s inflammation I’ve been taking cod liver oil, turmeric and black pepper as they all have anti-inflammatory effects.

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I tweeted about the pain asking advice using the hashtag  #ukrunchat (which is great for advice btw!) and many people recommend physios. I don’t think that a physio can necessarily help me this close to the day. Often when I’ve been to see any experts they take so long doing the first assessment of the injury, then diagnose it and tell you to come back for treatments.. Or even worse, they just tell you to rest. As I don’t really have time or money for that and I know vaguely what kind of exercises and stretches to do I decided not to go see anyone.

After the marathon (if I can run it) I have promised myself to take a good few weeks off running and let all my injuries properly heal. Then I might go and see a physio as well to get assessed and treated without relying on just google 🙂

Today I was going to run 8km but instead I used the crosstrainer for 45 minutes. Rest of the day will be resting..
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At the moment I’m sitting here with a salt compression around my knee drinking ridiculous amounts of water. Who knows, maybe I just need to be hydrated and then the pain will disappear.. I’ll believe in anything right now 😀 Keep your fingers crossed for me so I can run the marathon on Sunday.

Do you have any quick fixes for knee/IT band pain??

 

A little bit different marathon training

It’s just under 2 weeks til Chester Marathon so I thought I’d share something about my training.

I’ve never followed a strict plan and I’ve never started marathon training exactly 12 or 16 weeks before until now.  I told you in my last post that I decided to train for a marathon without really committing to one. I knew training would suffer if I didn’t plan though, so I did count 16 weeks backwards from Chester Marathon and started my “official” training for it. I had been running before it as well though so I didn’t start from zero.

Because of my history of injuries I decided to do things differently this time. I made a plan that I would only run 4 times a week, cross train twice and have one rest day a week. I also told myself not to exceed 65km per week just in case. I don’t think that kind of week ever happened.

At the start I was being very careful not to overdo my training and not to run too much too soon. Despite that I still started to get niggles and injuries, this time around it’s been my knee. Training has suffered and overall I have had to take quite a few rest days and a whole week off during this training period. I have run on average only 3 times a week and I think my weekly average has been about 50km. So very little running for marathon training. This time I have been going to the gym fairly regularly though. What has definitely differed is that in my previous marathon training cycles whenever I have got injured I have fallen into total despair where I just give up on life and lay on the couch eating crap food and feeling sorry for myself. Whereas this time when there was knee pain I went to the gym and did what I could there so even though there were days I couldn’t run there hasn’t been that many where I couldn’t exercise.

Another thing I did differently was the length of my longest run. For all my previous marathons I have run 32km at least once. This has been mainly for me to know psychologically that only 10km needs to be added to the distance on the day. This time I decided to try and leave the super long run out. Knowing my injury history I thought that it might just tire me out too much doing it too close to the day and I don’t know if it is necessary to run that 32km. If you look at any marathon training plans or follow any runners’ blogs or instagrams most people run 22 miles as they longest run. This equals to just over 35km. To me that sounds crazy. I understand that elite athletes practise the actual marathon distances sometimes but for a normal runner I really don’t see if running 35km in training is necessary. But then again, I’m no expert.

My friend has run quite a few marathons and for one of them last year her longest training run was 25km. For some that may seem very short but she felt that was enough for her.  And I’m not talking about someone who plods the marathons, she ran a pb of 3:11. So I guess I believe that if she could do it with 25km as her longest run I don’t have to run the 32km let alone 35km to do well in mine. I was too scared to leave it at 25km however, so I did 29km as my longest 😀

I always listen to her advice 🙂

 

I have also changed my longs runs a bit and included faster sections for some of my long runs. Before I used to do all my long runs at a slow easy pace and my tempos were shorter runs. Now I added some Goal Marathon Pace (GMP) kilometers to my long runs. For instance I ran 24km where the middle 8km was bit faster than GMP, or I did 26km where the last 10km where GMP. I don’t know if this makes a difference to anything but let’s hope so.

So the things that I have done completely differently this training cycle:

  1. Only 3 times running a week as opposed to about 5-6.
  2. Lower mileage than ever before for marathon training (During previous marathon trainings I have run anywhere between 50-90km a week)
  3. Cross-training (bike, crosstrainer, pilates) every week
  4. Shorter longest run than before (29km vs 32km)
  5. GMP included in long runs.

Based on this above list it might sound like I’m not very well prepared for the marathon. I just hope that the runs I have done have been of good enough quality and the quantity of the kilometers won’t matter as much. Some days I feel like I’m well prepared and will do well in Chester and other days I realise that the reality is that my training has not been what marathon training should be like and I have not run enough to be able to push through 42km in a steady pace. I guess I won’t know until race day.

Do you have a specific amount a week you need to run in order to feel prepared for a marathon? Or a certain distance for your longest run?

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